Stinging insects

Stinging insects like bees and hornets send more than 500,000 people to the emergency room each year. These pests are especially active during the second half of summer and early fall when the colonies forage for food that will sustain their queens during the winter. Browse our extensive list of biting insects and stinging insects for details on specific species.If you do find stinging insects or biting insects invading your property, contact a pest professional promptly. They will be able to inspect your home, confirm the species and recommend a course of pest control treatment.

Africanized Bees

Africanized “killer” bees looks so much like regular honeybees that the only way to tell the two apart is by measuring their bodies. A dangerous stinging insect, Africanized bees have been known bees looks

American Dog Ticks

The American dog tick gets its name from the fact that adult ticks prefer domestic dogs as hosts, and this tick species is only found in North America.white stripe down the center of its head and back.

Asian Tiger Mosquitoes

The Asian tiger mosquito is an exotic species that gets its “tiger” name from the single white stripe down the center of its head and back. This biting insect can transmit harmful diseases like West Nile virus and dengue fever.

Bald-faced Hornets

The bald-faced hornet is a relative of the yellowjacket and gets its common name from its largely black color and mostly white face. This stinging insect is named a hornet because of its large size and aerial nest.

Blacklegged Ticks

A notorious biting arachnid, the blacklegged tick is named for its dark legs, which are in contrast to its pale body. Blacklegged sometimes deer ticks.

Brown Dog Ticks

The brown dog tick is named for its color and because it is found on domestic dogs. Although it is unusual for a brown dog tick to bite humans.

Bumble Bees

Bumblebees are considered a beneficial insect because they pollinate crops and plants, however, they can sting.This type of stinging bee gets its common name from its habit

Carpenter Bees

Carpenter bees look like typical bumblebees but often lack yellow stripes. This type of stinging bee gets its common name from its habit of boring into wood like




#